Fatal Rivalry: Flodden, 1513: Henry VIII and James IV and the Decisive Battle for Renaissance Britain

Fatal Rivalry Flodden Henry VIII and James IV and the Decisive Battle for Renaissance Britain Flodden the biggest and bloodiest Anglo Scottish battle Its causes spanned many centuries its consequences were as extraordinary as the battle itself On September the vicious rivalry bet

  • Title: Fatal Rivalry: Flodden, 1513: Henry VIII and James IV and the Decisive Battle for Renaissance Britain
  • Author: GeorgeGoodwin
  • ISBN: 9780393073683
  • Page: 175
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Flodden 1513 the biggest and bloodiest Anglo Scottish battle Its causes spanned many centuries its consequences were as extraordinary as the battle itself.On September 9, 1513, the vicious rivalry between the young Henry VIII of England and his charismatic brother in law, James IV of Scotland, ended in violence at Flodden Field in the north of England It was the inevitFlodden 1513 the biggest and bloodiest Anglo Scottish battle Its causes spanned many centuries its consequences were as extraordinary as the battle itself.On September 9, 1513, the vicious rivalry between the young Henry VIII of England and his charismatic brother in law, James IV of Scotland, ended in violence at Flodden Field in the north of England It was the inevitable climax to years of mounting personal and political tension through which James bravely asserted Scotland s independence and Henry demanded its obedience.In Fatal Rivalry, George Goodwin, the best selling author of Fatal Colours, captures the vibrant Renaissance splendor of the royal courts of England and Scotland, with their unprecedented wealth, innovation, and artistic expression He shows how the wily Henry VII, far from the miser king of tradition, spent vast sums to secure his throne and elevate the monarchy to a new standard of magnificence among the courts of Europe He demonstrates how James IV competed with the elder Henry, even claiming that Arthurian legend supported a separate Scottish identity Such rivalry served as a substitute for war until Henry VIII s belligerence forced the real thing.As England and Scotland scheme toward their biggest ever battle, Goodwin deploys a fascinating and treacherous cast of characters maneuvering ministers, cynical foreign allies, conspiring cardinals, and contrasting queens in Katherine of Aragon and Margaret Tudor.Finally, at Flodden on September 9, 1513, King James seems poised for the crushing victory that will confirm him as Scotland s greatest king and if an old military foe proves unable to stop him put all of Britain in his grasp.Five hundred years after this decisive battle, Fatal Rivalry combines original sources and modern scholarship to re create the royal drama, the military might, and the world in transition that created this bitter conflict.

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    1 thought on “Fatal Rivalry: Flodden, 1513: Henry VIII and James IV and the Decisive Battle for Renaissance Britain”

    1. This is a marvellously detailed account of the Battle of Flodden and the political circumstances leading up to and surrounding the event from both English and Scottish perspectives, as far as is possible. Goodwin draws on the latest research and critically analyses a wide range of contemporary sources in this impressive feat. I would have liked to have read more about the social impact of the Battle of Flodden and more about Katherine of Aragon's involvement. Overall, however, this is an authori [...]

    2. Good overview of English Scottish relations during the late Medieval/early Modern period. The book focuses initially on the rapprochement undertaken by Henry VII and James IV in the wake of the Perkin Warbeck affair. Both sought and won recognition of their respective conditions as king of England and Scotland respectively, permitting a redirection of resources away from conflict. This did not last. Henry VIII wanted military glory, a yearning that overthrew his father's more pacific policy. Jam [...]

    3. A quite interesting book.The majority of the book focuses ( somewhat misleadingly given the title) on the background to Flodden, the English and Scottish rivalries.). The description of the battle itself fills only one chapter. The book is however clearly well researched.The book itself is more of an overview of the time period and does not go into any great detail - so it is probably not for those new to the era. I already knew a little bit of background information due to my reading on the Tud [...]

    4. I never thought I'd be one to read a book about battles and kings, but this is a fascinating and tragic (for James IV) story that will appeal to anyone interested in the histories of Scotland and England. At times I found 'Fatal Rivalry' a bit repetitive, but overall I enjoyed it. Goodwin has written a well-sourced book that provides a wealth of information not only on the Battle of Flodden, but also on the characters involved and the critical events leading up to the battle.

    5. Solid recap of the Anglo-Scottish rivalry between Henry VIII and James IV, whether politically or in Renaissance patronage and construction, leading to the showdown at Flodden in 1513 (which, ironically, happened when Katherine of Aragon was regent and Henry was in France). Goodwin adds the recent information on terrain, especially groundwater discharge, but sticks it in two pages at the very end.

    6. I found this to be a very interesting book, which gave sufficient detail to explain what happened and why, but without becoming bogged down in trivia. In addition, the author did not appear to express any bias towards either side. I would thoroughly recommend this book to anyone interested in Tudor and/or the problems between England and Scotland.

    7. Goodwin does the impossible, taking myriad details and ancient names and tying them together through fine scholarship and breezy prose into a fascinating story of two key British kings, one Scott, one English. Kudos. Useful for scholars and yet inviting to anyone who wants to understand Renaissance Britain!

    8. Good guide albeit a tad dry, for someone who hasn't really read much of this period of history it was an informative start.

    9. This was a well written and interesting non-fiction that detailed so much more of the late 15th - early 16th century struggle between England and Scotland than the battle of Flodden. Although Henry VIII is a well known historical figure, I have read very little about the Scottish king, James IV, who held such promise as a true Renaissance monarch. His untimely death was truly a tragic event for a Scotland trying to heal from years of instability. As a die-hard Ricardian, I appreciated Goodwin's [...]

    10. Interesting account of the English victory over a Scots army led by King James IV on 9/7/1513. Goodwin sees James as a successful monarch who united Scotland behind him and had gained recognition as an equal by Henry VII. English kings had treated their Scot counterparts as their vassals. In 1502 James and Henry VII agreed to a "Treaty of Perpetual Peace", to seal the deal James married Henry's older daughter, Margaret. Coming to the throne in 1509, Henry VIII returned to the policy of subordina [...]

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