Word and Object

Word and Object Language consists of dispositions socially instilled to respond observably to socially observable stimuli Such is the point of view from which a noted philosopher and logician examines the notion of

  • Title: Word and Object
  • Author: Willard Van Orman Quine
  • ISBN: 9780262670012
  • Page: 366
  • Format: Paperback
  • Language consists of dispositions, socially instilled, to respond observably to socially observable stimuli Such is the point of view from which a noted philosopher and logician examines the notion of meaning and the linguistic mechanisms of objective reference In the course of the discussion, Professor Quine pinpoints the difficulties involved in translation, brings toLanguage consists of dispositions, socially instilled, to respond observably to socially observable stimuli Such is the point of view from which a noted philosopher and logician examines the notion of meaning and the linguistic mechanisms of objective reference In the course of the discussion, Professor Quine pinpoints the difficulties involved in translation, brings to light the anomalies and conflicts implicit in our language s referential apparatus, clarifies semantic problems connected with the imputation of existence, and marshals reasons for admitting or repudiating each of various categories of supposed objects He argues that the notion of a language transcendent sentence meaning must on the whole be rejected meaningful studies in the semantics of reference can only be directed toward substantially the same language in which they are conducted.

    • ☆ Word and Object || ☆ PDF Read by ✓ Willard Van Orman Quine
      366 Willard Van Orman Quine
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      Posted by:Willard Van Orman Quine
      Published :2019-09-05T22:12:41+00:00

    1 thought on “Word and Object”

    1. Rigorous is a good term to describe 'Word and Object'. This is one of those books that makes you wonder if the author was beaten as a child. Essentially all of his claims are unassailable, yet at the end you're not sure if it's at all right - but it will force you to think about the consequences of what he says. The book starts off with pure linguistics, moves to philosophy, and ends with semantics (OK, the whole book is semantics). If you make it to the later chapters, you might go pages withou [...]

    2. Word and Object is a masterpiece in modern philosophy and, as I worked through it, I was struck by how much more contemporary discussions in the domain make when I have Quine for context. The book sets up a number of the problems that Quine poses for historical views in philosophy of language, like problems with vagueness and translation, and then Quine offers an alternative account of how to develop a (highly naturalized) philosophical programme. The book has passages that are a bit dated, wher [...]

    3. I know that this is supposed to be a classic of analytic philosophy, but two things about the book really irked me. 1) The practice of so-called "radical translation," while interesting takes as a model of science a sort of laboratory condition that not only does not match actual linguistic anthropology (something Quine would no doubt grant) but cannot in principle match any anthropological practice and 2) even if one leaves aside the tremendously huge behavioristic assumptions of his account of [...]

    4. Essential for anyone interested in philosophy of language or even more broadly analytic philosophy. I'm not sure I fully buy into Quine's idea of current language as consisting of the subject's current dispositions to respond verbally to current stimulation. I think it has to account for more than just that. It's a great book, but I'm much more inclined to some combination of a Lewisian and Wittgensteinian view of language.

    5. Everything is this book is *fire emoji*, except for Quine's argument against modality which is uncharacteristically awful. However, he is highly motivated to have some sort of argument, because trying to find a naturalistic explanation (in keeping with the spirit of the rest of the book) of what makes statements about necessity and possibility meaningful is very difficult.This book is hard work, and unless you are already familiar with the contours of debate in philosophy of language a lot of it [...]

    6. Please don't read this without supervision. It was kind of cool though, and really interesting, even though I don't agree with his pragmatist assumptions. Hopefully, in some time I'll actually understand everything (or most of it, I mean).

    7. This book was quite simply amazing. Quine builds up what it means to learn language and communicate from a behavioralist perspective, yet still relates it to logic. It was not an easy book to read and it took me quite a while to finish, but I feel like in almost every chapter there is an "aha" moment where I realized something new about language, logic, and philosophy. Basically, the book starts from the premise that you go to a foreign land where you know nothing about the natives' language, so [...]

    8. Though one may find oneself disagreeing with many of Quine's positions, one cannot fail to appreciate the accomplishment here. Not only is Quine a clear and clever writer, he also provides a compelling, systematic, and beautiful understanding of understanding the relationship between the way we talk about things and the way things really are. Where this relationship is tenuous, Quine artfully maneuvers his way through the thicket.

    9. Exceedingly well-written as much as it is exceedingly difficult. Pre-requisites are the philosophical questions on language, meaning, proposition, analytics, epistemology and necessity. Not a book to be simply read, but returned and studied in detail. Without the pre-requisites and hard work, this book will pose a great challenge to the layman reader, as myself.

    10. Quine analyzes the referential mechanisms of English. Along the way he introduces the notion of "radical translation", the attempt to translate a wholly unknown language into a known one, concluding that it is, in general, not possible.

    11. This is a key book in Anglo/American philosophy in the mid twentieth century. It's written for those who are philosophically literate, students and others in the field. Quine was an original and very interesting voice with an amazing intellect.

    12. Still savouring the interanimation of sentences, the stimulus meaning the way a child might learn to speak through reinforcement tbc

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