On Ends (De finibus bonorum et malorum)

On Ends De finibus bonorum et malorum De finibus bonorum et malorum On the ends of good and evil is a philosophical work by the Roman orator politician and philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero It consists of five books in which Cicero expl

  • Title: On Ends (De finibus bonorum et malorum)
  • Author: Marcus Tullius Cicero Harris Rackham
  • ISBN: 9780674990449
  • Page: 407
  • Format: Hardcover
  • De finibus bonorum et malorum On the ends of good and evil is a philosophical work by the Roman orator, politician and philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero It consists of five books, in which Cicero explains the philosophical views of Epicureanism, Stoicism, and the Platonism of Antiochus of Ascalon The book was developed in the summer of the year 45 BC within about oneDe finibus bonorum et malorum On the ends of good and evil is a philosophical work by the Roman orator, politician and philosopher Marcus Tullius Cicero It consists of five books, in which Cicero explains the philosophical views of Epicureanism, Stoicism, and the Platonism of Antiochus of Ascalon The book was developed in the summer of the year 45 BC within about one and a half months Together with the Tusculanae Quaestiones written shortly afterwards, De finibus is the most extensive philosophical work of Cicero source wiki

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      407 Marcus Tullius Cicero Harris Rackham
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      Published :2019-09-03T21:27:47+00:00

    1 thought on “On Ends (De finibus bonorum et malorum)”

    1. I recently read the book “Friends Divided” by Gordon S. Wood. In the book Wood made a point that Marcus Tullius Cicero (106 BCE-43 BCE) was a favorite of both John Adams (1735-1826) and Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) and they quoted Cicero frequently. I have always enjoyed reading about Cicero, but I suddenly realized I have never read any of his books. Audible had this audiobook by Cicero written toward the end of his life while he was in exile at his countryside estate. Apparently, he did a [...]

    2. "'Now it was a mistake to make virtue consist in an act of choice, for this implies that the very thing that is the ultimate Good itself seeks to get something else.'" --TullyPeerless rhetoric, noble thinking. We expect nothing less from him.

    3. Read it in Hungarian, not in Latin. Though there were several parts where I didn't agree with Cicero, or that I found his arguing a little bit flawed (at least in the Hungarian translation, in some parts he seems to twist the words of Epicurus), all in all I found it quite enjoyable and interesting. Wish it were complete!

    4. In this book Cicero develops the ideas of the three prevailing philosophical ideas of his time. He gives several accounts for and against them and as such it is a good introductionary read into ancient philosophy. Another side topic is the fact that Cicero establishes that one need not to philosophize in a traditional language but that philosophy should be adaptable to everybody's mother tongue.

    5. Go to prueter. Click on my Latin page. Click on books read. Click on Marcus Tullius Cicero. Scrool down to 545.

    6. Why does Cicero always ultimately leave me cold? I don't fervently disagree with much I've read by him, yet I feel like I'm always waiting for the passage which will convince me of his reputed brilliance. As for this particular work, 'On Ends' is a dialogue between the convinced Epicurian, Torquatus, and Cicreo, followed by another dialogue with the Stoic Cato. The style of disputation is very different in both debates--much of this has to do with the premise of Epicurianism and Stoicism and its [...]

    7. Reviewing Cicero is difficult (he wrote in genres he partially created and quite unlike modern philosophy), but the translation can be commented on. The footnotes are very good for not just clarifying details of the common biographical references, but drawing attention to the key point of arguments.The common thread is of course the nature of the good and happy life and arguments are presented in various ways and with varying success. Similarly to Platonic dialogues we are not offered a worked s [...]

    8. “For nothing in life is more worth investigating than philosophy in general, and the question raised in this work in particular: what is the end, what is the ultimate and final goal, to which all our deliberations on living well and acting rightly should be directed?”

    9. Ce livre serait une bonne introduction à l'éthique des grandes écoles de la période hellénistique, quoi que la lecture est parfois rendue difficile par la structure un peu forcée (je pense principalement au livre IV, qui souffre de nombreuses répétitions. À ce sujet, voyez l'article de Th. Bénatouïl : "Structure, standards and Stoic moral progress in De Finibus 4", 2015). J'ai travaillé principalement les livres III et V pour étudier la théorie de l'oikeiôsis stoïcien et la versi [...]

    10. Although this work will be somewhat interesting to the student of Epicureanism and Stoicism, it has by far the most to offer to anyone interested in Cicero's own thought. His presentation of the philosophical schools he's attempting to refute has sometimes been accused of being slanted, but Cicero (the consummate orator) never forgets that he is addressing an audience, and the key question we should ask is what he means to say to that audience.De Finibus is an subtle accomplishment, but unfortun [...]

    11. A classic and necessary sourcebook for anyone wanting to understand the debates between the philosophers of the Stoa and the Garden

    12. Perhaps the translation was off, but I found this work too crabbed to find sufficient apples of wisdom.

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